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I am so pleased to be a member of Jol’s Club and feel that this is going to be a perfect place for authors and readers to meet.  This is a brilliant opportunity. I finally published my first crime novel, A Few Bad Boys, last year and I remember how elated  (and nervous) I felt at that point.  I didn’t realise at the time how much there was to learn about marketing in this digital world, in which we now live.  It has not been easy but I have tried to ensure that I enjoy the fact that I am learning something new regularly.  In the beginning simple tasks seemed to take an eternity and yes, I did get frustrated but one thing people know about me is, I never give up.  I also felt that most of my time was being taken up by marketing and not actually writing, but I k...

Thinking Three Moves Ahead

No, this isn’t the provisional title for some new crime thriller (although I have started writing a new series that will be out in the Autumn) but another blog about the sort of things you have to think about if you’re an indie author. The question I get asked most frequently is how I stay motivated, given the only deadlines are the ones I set myself. The simple answer is that if I have any chance of continuing to write full-time I have to remain productive. I believe I spoke in an earlier blog about the calendar I created myself for the year but, where it gets complicated is tying in dates for editing and then for launch. The upshot of all this is I can end up planning a novel before I have even started writing the one that precedes it and there is a good couple of months between me finis...

My own never-ending story

I have been writing the end of this story for over a week now, and the finish line seems to get further away every day. But today is the day. The story must end (‘cos I am way to busy at work for it not to.) Right so where were we ….ah, yes… when we left Izy and Adam on the balcony… Izy had just revealed a most revealing secret, midnight was fast approaching and the curse on Adam (that neither knows about) will either be broken or forever remain … let’s get back to our unsuspecting MCs, shall we…

Fists of Stone and Tropes

[Originally posted on my Goodreads author blog: February 10, 2018] Like a lot of kids who grew up during the ’80s and ’90s, I went through a martial arts / ninja phase (which I never entirely grew out of). I took some classes, devoured instructional books and videos, and messed around with weapons. I also watched a lot of martial arts movies. So, when I read the story of Glaucus of Carystus as a postgraduate researching material for my MPhil thesis, his tale resonated with me. According to Pausanias (Descriptions of Greece 6.10.1ff), Glaucus earned his living by working on a farm, far removed from the world of those heroes who travelled the land winning prizes and glory at the various athletics festivals. One day, as he ploughed a field, the ploughshare came loose and fell out....

Blog Space

Not entirely sure yet what to do with this space, but I figured it would be a little more fun to add something vs nothing. So, let’s just dive into what’s going on in my writing world.  July 28th I’ll have my first novella out. It is very different than my series. Instead of curses, demons, and taboo magic, I decided to have fun with a fairy tale. Modernizing Cinderella was actually easier than I expected. Instead of household chores, I had her work for her family. Instead of not being able to go to the ball, I made it a school dance. Now, that is all good and well, but I get board without magic, so I added more. A lot more.  It would be fun to get into more details, but instead I’ll save that for the book. If you’re interested, go and check the link...

New upcoming release

I’m happy to share the follow up to  my debut On the Ropes published by Evernight Publishing has been accepted.  The Warrior’s Whisper will be released in September. More details to follow.

Congratulations, Ma’am, It’s a Book Tour!

It’s official and starts on Monday, July 16th through July 23rd. Sponsored by the Historical Fiction Virtual Book Blog and Passages to the Past FB page, book blogger and book promoter, Amy Bruno. Visit the book blog tour for the links to each blog along the journey and to sign up for the contest to win one of two signed hardcover copies of the novel “Blood and Ink.” Thanks to everyone who is supporting me on this journey and to all the tweet, FB, and blog followers! See you on the blog road!! Link: http://hfvirtualbooktours.com/bloodandinkblogtour/

House Under the Hill – released 15th June 2018

Historical novel based in Edwardian times and the 1950s.  The story of Hudson Ewbanke Kearley Liberal MP and millionaire who built a mansion on the HIraethog moor in the 1890s. Hudson entertained important guests at the house such as WWI Prime Minister, David Lloyd George, the Prince of Wales and the First Governor General of Ireland, Tim Healey. But after the war, the house fell into decline and was abandoned by the mid-1950s. It is now a ruin, and beyond repair. My interest in the ruin, after living near it in the 1970-80s, led to researching and writing this short historical novel of 62k words. Locals call the house haunted, but there are few that know the real story. My aim was to give people the opportunity to go back in time and experience the house as it was in its he...

Facts, Fiction, and Fandom: Harnessing Geek Power to Research Your Books

There’s a saying about writing historical fiction that I’m rather fond of – “you can make a lot of stuff up, but Lincoln has to be tall.” In this day and age, information is easier to get a hold of than ever before, and that can be a tremendous benefit to us novelists. However, that also means it’s easier to catch us red-handed if we don’t do our research. And in the age of the internet, you can be sure our sin will be found out. Yeah, our job as writers is to be a storyteller above all else, and I certainly believe in dramatic license. However, that’s not an excuse for us to not put any effort into researching whatever it is we’re writing about. Nothing can replace the traditional approach of going to a library or bookstore and doing some in-depth reading. My debut novel, The Brotherhood ...

Prehistoric Crisis: DinoRule Region of Jungle

We continue our journey of DinoRule to the region of Junglona or the jungle region according to the natives who live in the area. The natives are known as Junglonians which roughly translates to jungle people in their tongue. Here, for the most part, the natives live in modest huts. As seen above, the leaders and elders live in clay/brick keeps. The region of Junglona is rather hot and humid all year long. The summers tend to be rather humid while the winters the humidity tends to be a bit lower. Natives don’t mind the heat and humidity because there tends to be a regular dosage of rain yearly. The rain keeps the grass green and the trees with all their leaves. Drought is the last thing the residents of the jungle region have to worry about. The people in Junglona tend to be more dow...

Didn’t know it would be this hard.

So… I decided 2018 would be my year. No more messing around. This year I would get something published. Then I came across a post on Facebook asking for authors who wanted to participate in an anthology. Here it is, I thought, my foot in the door. Not completely alone, and I’d have others to guide me on my journey. Got a little trigger happy signing up for these anthologies. Think I raised my hand for… seven or eight for the year. A big ask, but by George, go hard or go home.  Six months on, going home sounds like a good plan. One has been published, one is set for release next month, but I am struggling to finish the next 2 which I should have completed by the end of June. My issue … nothing stays on script. As a pantser, my muse is constantly imagining e...

Open Source Scholarship

[Originally posted on my Goodreads author blog: January 9, 2018] Academic papers and journals tend to live behind paywalls. These seldom benefit the actual scholars, those who write or peer-review the materials. The money doesn’t flow to them. And researchers find themselves having to pay a small fortune for access. Sure, if they’re part of well-funded departments, their universities may pick up the tab. But this isn’t always the case, especially for independent scholars or writers who’d like to expand their knowledge without breaking the bank. Hence I’m a big fan of open-source scholarship. When I was researching The Monster Hunter’s Handbook: The Ultimate Guide to Saving Mankind from Vampires, Zombies, Hellhounds, and Other Mythical Beasts, and writing...